Tag Archives: control

Don’t Buy A Stupid Stretch Wrapper 4: YOU ARE IN CONTROL

So, you have taken the necessary steps, but how do you know nothing will change with your new method?

Lets review the steps taken so far.  You have DEFINED the problem and admitted that you could be better at wrapping.

We walked through MEASURING your current methods to establish a baseline.  Additionally you used the ISTA to ASTM methods to ANALYZE your systems.

Then you IMPROVED your methods (and hopefully wrote the specifications for your packaging).

Now to CONTROL the changes.  There are several methods to verify that the settings of the machine are maintained.  They could range from on board monitoring systems, to cut and weighs, to continued containment testing.

The theory of all is that by wrapping consistently you will utilize the same amount of film on identical pallets.  By incorporating any of the methods into a customer’s PM routine, you will use consistency as your control.

control excellence

Lets expand on the various methods of measuring and how they work: The first is ON BOARD MONITORING.  This system will measure film as it’s applied to the load and report back to the customer via close based servers.  This is the best and most accurate method as it will allow customers to view the data in multiple ways.  It could be linear footage, amount of stretch, cost per load…..the list goes on and on.

The second method is the STRETCH FILM CUT AND WEIGH TEST.  The principle here is the same, but the control is the weight of the film.  You purchase film by the roll, but the resins that make the film are actually sold by the pound.  Using weight is an excellent method to verify cost per load and consistency of wrap.

The last method is CONTAINMENT.  This method is also very accurate as every revolution of film on a pallet will increase the containment force.  By measuring containment, you can verify that your wrapper settings have remained set to specifications.

The last method that can be used is a visual inspection of machine settings; but know that if there has been a film change, or as the machine wears, it will become inconsistent in performance. Different films stretch at different forces; putting on a softer film but leaving the machine at the same mechanical settings will increase film yield but decrease containment force.  Wear, well that speaks for itself, all things eventually wear.  The more play in your roll carriage bearings, the more film can slip through your roll carriage costing you money.  As a side note, this is also an issue with some film monitoring systems.  Because of how film is measured, they cannot account for slip.

Well, that wraps up our “Don’t Buy a Stupid Stretch Wrapper” series.  I hope that you enjoyed it and feel slightly smarter than you did prior to reading this.

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